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schools are poor people. that is the height of inequality. that is what i call it a civil rights issue. those people need choices. more kids will be better educated and it will have a catalytic effect on the school system. [applause] >> the secretary of state, as a member of the cabinet, [unintelligible] >> it has been a pleasure to hear you. it was worth traveling coach class. [laughter] the ultimate compliment. >> he made the point that ideas matter. it also matter in national security. america realized it could not win the cold war if it still had a scandalous segregation in the south. winning the civil rights battle at home was a precondition of winning the fight politically across the globe. i think looking from the outside there is the same danger now. when i go to china and i criticize them for their lack of democracy, they say but we are educating all our people. you did not do that in britain and america. when i had been in the middle east, and talk to people on the edge of radicalism, they say look at the protest in justices in your british and european and american nations.
dedicated his life to public service and is lauded for his work on education, civil- rights national service, immigration, transportation, the environment, and high-tech issues. >> he is also the greatest karaoke sing their -- singer and all of congress. -- in all of congress. [applause] >> he just told me i had five minutes. what do you think of this program? [applause] it is about time. i want to thank francis and fong. i think this is the very first statewide heritage month held with the mayor of san francisco. let me say something about heritage month in san francisco and your mayor. in the old days, you remember san francisco was known for passing all of these anti- chinese ordinances to limit the movement, the productivity of chinese in the city. we know two things. change happens. maybe the state of california is the state of golden opportunities, where we have a chinese-american mayor of san francisco. 35 years ago, congress members passed similar resolutions in both house and the senate to formally recognize the first 10 days of may as asian-pacific heritage week. one year later, pr
the international covenant of civil and political rights on express understanding that he was not self-executing. so it did not create applications enforceable in the federal court. the supreme court in the united states has told at the very standard applied in this treaty that is not self-executing means nobody has access to any quarter. there is no enforceable right to get anybody in america create in this treaty. the mac to enter the senator, i'm not aware of the specific british request and what response they drew. i would only say this. it's important, mr. president to understand whether distemper senator from massachusetts and i differ on most of these treaties, with the same disagreement on the law of the sea treaty. the question is in my opinion is their sovereignty of believe infringed upon our sovereignty and with that i yield the floor. >> mr. president, i yield five minutes. to the senator from illinois. >> by methinks senator kerry, senator mccain, senator lugar and so many others who have put this matter to the floor. it was 22 years ago when a historic event took place on the fourth u
necessary mehserle on the platform of the fruitvale station. at 9:00 this morning two oakland civil rights ordinary reasons to will argue before the ninth circuit court of appeals in san francisco that bart police officers should not receive legal immunity against civil suit filed by grant's family. >>> time now 6:47. tara is back with more about that accident on the peninsula. >> that is right. we actually have an incident here it's a solo vehicle. this is in the san mateo area. be aware of it. we're going to take a live look at our maps and show you where we do have trouble presidents here. this is typical for livermore area. if we head up into contra costa county into the pittsburg area it's a little slow. at the bay bridge toll plaza the metering lights are on. sun just starting to come up here. you're looking at an extra 10- 15 minutes to get into san francisco. in milpitas a lot of brake lights here. this is the typical what we see on 237 as you head westbound. 6:48 here's steve. >> thank you. >>> mostly sunny. maybe partly cloudy skies today. a little bit of a break. rain returns in
that people make. >> we've come a long way baby, and i still remember just before the civil rights movement when racists and masog masogyists. whatever happened to content of character not color of skin, you can't criticize susan race because she's black and female, what are the rules. >> jon: and we thought we'd play it clip for you from the msnbc anchor. >> mccain tried to make her unnominatable, and would look weak. and mccain inappropriate political attack and gave us the horrible optics of he and lindsey graham as old white establishment folks wrongly and repeatedly attacking a younger black women and moments when they went strongly blue. >> jon: and claims that mccain went on a witch hunt and tarring the ambassador in the press. that's quite a loaded word. >> so many words that he can say that for some reason i can't say. next time we hear the usual suspects in the review and denouncing rush limbo, remember, they were stone cold silent most likely so far on all of this race baiting going on on the rice-mccain issue. >> jon: what about the real issues what are the real issues that the
of the fruitvale bart station. this morning at 9:00 if two oakland civil rights attorneys will be arguing for the ninth circuit court of appeals. arguing bart police officers should not receive legal immunity against a civil lawsuit filed by grant's family. last year a federal judge ruled to allow the lawsuit to move ahead. the police officers appealed that ruling to the ninth circuit court. >>> this is a seventh day of a strike at the nation's busiest port. clerical workers at the ports of los angeles and long beach set up picket lines last tuesday. they have been trying to negotiate a new contract for 2.5 years. they are also claiming their jobs are being outsourced out of the state and across the pacific ocean. now officials at the port deny that charge. the list of the dock workers are not crossing the picket lines and say the strike is costing the port as much as $1 billion every day. >>> major development on treasure island is moving forward. they now have until the end of the month to choose a new home to make way for the development. $1.5billion project includes up to 8,000 new ho
as a voice for civil liberties and civil rights. you have both bush signing it, drafting it, and then it is astonishing that these nativist voices, the fear of the united nations this paranoid sensibility that captures a few votes in the republican party prevent it from passing the senate that is supposed to be a batian of reason. you worked in the obama white house, does it shock you when lindsey graham stands up and votes against this. he's somewhat a respected member of the senate. >> nothing shocks me any more. the republican party has been moving away from disability for some time. when you look at other things that the congress has focused on medicaid, healthcare, the affordable care act, even looking at what's going on with the fiscal cliff right? are we going to balance our budget by lessoning lessening the support to those with disability or focus on those at the top 1%. this trend is ongoing and i hope it doesn't continue. the bipartisan tradition around disability is longstanding, and i think it's mourn. it's one of those few issues that traditionally both republi
it happen, but in the civil rights era, for example, when we had those celebrated filibusters, they were not partisan in the sense. they were factional. the fact is the filibusters done by southern democratic senators to oppose civil rights or voting rights legislation were opposed by republicans just as they were by notary -- non-southern departments, and civil rights legislation, overcoming filibusters being enacted was at least as much to the credibility of the senate minority leader as to lyndon johnson so what we've seen now is a regular use of the filibuster now as a partisan tool and not just a group of members of the party, but the entire party as fashioned by the minority leader. the second is the use of the filibuster routinely, not on issues of great national significance, and not simply on those issues with the majority leader kills the amendment tree, but on issues and nominations which ultimately pass unanimously or near unanimously, and keep in mind on no , nomins where holds, which are notices that you will deny unanimous concept, and in some instances have been filibust
things. it's about a young leader who opened the doors for civil rights, inspired a generation, and literally took us to the moon. get a copy of "jack kennedy, elusive hero." it makes a fabulous, affordable gift for people who share your ideals. it's a paperback, it's cheaper. we'll be right back. +9@> >>> we're back. the republican party, as we just said, is in a soul searching mode right now looking to explain its loss and find a new candidate to take them to a win. back in the 1950s the moderate wing of the republican party was coming off defeat until general dwight d. eisenhower came in creating what would later be called eisenhower republicans, a group that seems near extinction. evans thomas is author of a new book that is getting great reviews. and david eisenhower, for whom camp david was named, is the grandson of ike. >>> we're back. the republican party, as we just said, is in a soul searching mode right now looking to explain its loss and find a new candidate to get them to win. back in the 1950s, the and by a landslide in 1956. >> your thoughts about his legacy then
for oscar grants civil rights case will be in court today. there will be arguing the rulings against johannes mehserle and the other two officers involved leading to oscar grants killing should not be overturned. in may of 2011 it was ruled that bart could not be held responsible for the 2009 shooting death. patel ruled that most of the issues in the $50 million federal lawsuit on behalf of grass family against current and former birds police officer should be decided by a jury at a trial. >> president obama and republicans appear to be playing a game of political chicken right now. the president put out a proposal for 1.6 trillion dollars in higher taxes over several years. and 200 billion in new spending to is that stimulate the economy. treasury secretary jim guy near saying republicans do not have a plan. as far as where we are with the fiscal cliff negotiations right now, we are nowhere. >> said in an moderations tend to be smaller if the president is having a second one. this coming january's inauguration for president obama will follow the same trend. there'll be close to 800,
have civil and human rights for all people. the progressive message we say that we should promote dialogue and diplomacy before we ever find ourselves in military conflicts. the progressive message is about an inclusive america. all colors, all cultures, all faiths. and an america that says if you -- if you live in this country and you want to work hard, the economy should be robust and broad enough and fair enough for you to make a good run in this economy. if you work 40 hours a week, you should be able to feed your family. shouldn't have to resort to public assistance. it's talking about having to stand up for the rights of labor, the rights of working men and women. the right to be able to be paid fairly. the right to be able to go to the doctor. the right to be able to look forward to a decent, fair retirement. the right to be able to see that your children will be able to get a good education that can see them through. in other words, the progressive message is the message of an inclusive america that makes sure that our economic and our environmental lives are strong, healt
compliance with the legislation. laws such as the civil rights rs act, title 9, the family leave act strengthen our position. most importantly, i'm reminded of the veterans who have returned from the wars in iraq and afghanistan. the brave veterans who have served in all the places we have asked them to go, who have advanced the interests and ideals of the united states. we owe them a debt for their service. many of them have returned with severe wounds, some requiring lifetime care. and i'd like to just read a statement from one of the veterans that appeared in front of the foreign relations committee, a disabled attorney and veteran -- marine veteran john lancaster. and this is what he said. and i quote here. "in 1968 i arrived in vietnam in the tet ow offensive as an infay platoon commander. five months later i was shot and injured in a fire fight. after months of rehas been takers i arrived back home in western new york a disabled veteran. although my friends and family welcomed me home, society did not receive me quite as we will. while there is certainly tension around the poli
violate their civil rights as nudists, the ordinance was sponsored by a local supervisor who says his constituents were tired of seeing a group of naked men every day. >>> a $4.1 million modernization project at los angeles international airport wouldn't be complete without a caviar bar, along with 18 new state of the art boarding gates, the airport is adding 50 premiere luxury and dining outlets. the airport is adding a caviar and champagne bar. >> really? >> why, you ask? one of the chief developers explains the way you capture the flavor of a city is through its food. hello! >> top 1%. >>> if you're away from your television right now, running around the house, getting ready for work, come on over. take 30 seconds. nasa just released these stunning pictures of earth at night. check it out. we've zoomed in to the united states in this next piece of video. you see the u.s. lit up at night. isn't that incredible? the great thing about this is the pictures are cloud-free. head to nasa.gov and you can see a lot more of these pictures, share them with the kiddies. they will think this is
the civil rights act and the voting rights act and the americans with disabilities act, is still capable of voting to change things, let alone send a message that could change the world. i ask colleagues to do for the world what they've done for america -- walk down the aisle here and for millions everywhere who cannot walk make a stateme statement. raise your voice and vote for millions who are voiceless in their own lands. stand up for those who cannot stand up for themselves. this is not about the united nations. this is about common humanity. and this vote is to test whether the senate will stand up for those who cannot see or hear and whether senators can hear the truth and see the facts. please don't let captain brzynski down, please don't let senator bob dole down. most importantly, don't let the senate and the country down. approve this treaty. the presiding officer: the question occurs on the resolution of advice and consent to ratification of the convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. a senator: mr. president? i ask for the yeas and nays. the presiding officer:
judiciary, property law and human rights law, trying to expand civil society in ways that will make china flourish in the future. we are lucky to have you. three clique points i want to make before we move on, before we hear from professor alford, cohen and gewirtz. it is important to note that in the cycles of the u.s./china relationship we are entering an extraordinarily interesting period. i can't remember a time in recent history where we have had a president in an election but roughly coincided exactly with the leadership change in beijing. so what have we seen in beijing? in recent weeks, this very month. 2,000 delegates visiting beijing, putting together a slate of 370 committee members, chopping off 25 members of the politburo and some agreement around not 9 but 7 members of the standing committee of the politburo which i would refer to or considered to be the board of directors if it will end a reelected president on this side which is to say we are going to begin the new year with a clean slate and that ability which is so unusual in the u.s./china relationship to start fresh an
the leadership conference on civil and human rights, the wounded warrior project, the hindu american foundation the islamic center of -- society of north america, the jewish federations of america, the national catholic social justice lobby, and the veterans of foreign wars. let me share a couple of letters. bernard from franklin county in my state wrote, "i'm concerned about recent grumblings about former senator santorum and others. i was a lot of regard for the a.d.a. and a a wareness of discrimination against people with disabilities. when will the senate take up this u.n. resolution? what can i do to convince oppositional senators that this is an important and necessary resolution for people with disabilities, especially our nation's veterans? well, bernard, my colleagues on the other side of the aisle -- nor mccain, former majority leader bob dole, both of whom served our country honorably in the armed forces, and 21 veterans organizations agree with you. this should be an opportunity for all americans to come together and show the world we're committed to ensuring the basic human dignity
the americans with disabilities act, which was extremely difficult to negotiate. we passed the civil rights bill. there was, if you will, a precedent in terms of cooperation and climate. as the representative point out, later on that would manifest itself in what was really an unprecedented interaction between the white house and congress on dealing with the invasion to kuwait and trying to pull together a unified perspective. i think the climate -- it was not accidental. we worked awfully hard in order to maintain that. i certainly feel that the key to it was the fact that tom foley and president bush had been members of congress to gather. they had developed a personal relationship. other members of congress, including dave and others, had been there. the president was in the house -- there were personal relationships that we, frankly, in the nicest sense of the word, exploited as much as possible in order to maintain the comedy of the process. one more point, since we were commenting on him -- he was really in my opinion from at least our perspective the heart and soul of the details of this
didn't always look like this. the original burned down during the civil war. workers rebuilt this one here in the 1600s. so let's take a stroll right through the gate. you have to go through this right here, this big wooden block, and on the other side you'll see a beautiful array of maple trees. and if you walk a little bit further across this path that you'll see, you'll actually find something completely different. beyond this you'll see something that is a little different. doesn't seem to quite fit with the rest of the temple, but that's what makes it so unique. along with traditional temple buildings, there's also a western-style aqueduct. the arched brick and granite waterway was built in the 19th century. people used it to transport water and goods to and from lake biwa in neighboring shiga prefecture. many protested its construction at the time because it is so drastically different from the rest of the temple. but now people say it fits right in. you can hear the water trickling through even today. and behind the aqueduct, you see the beautiful mountains right outside the ci
in march last year, but it slowly grew into a civil war. air strikes, gun battles, car bombings. the violence has taken its toll. a human rights group based in britain says more than 40,000 people have died. through it all, president assad and his administration have hung on to power. a spokesperson for the syrian national coalition argues getting rid of assad requires a two-track approach. walid al bunni says nations need to isolate the president and support opposition fighters. >> we have two ways, putting pressure on russia, china and iran to stop supporting this regime, and then this would be useful, or supporting militarily the opposition or the interfering by the nato to make free zone and no-fly zone. >> reporter: russia and china have repeatedly vetoed u.n. security council resolutions on imposing sanctions against syria. without their support, the international efforts can only put limited pressure on president assad. diplomats here are still hoping their efforts will help in some part to end the conflict in syria. however, after 20 months of violence, they've learned g
in march last year, but it slowly grew into a civil war -- air strikes, gun battles, car bombings. the violence has taken its toll. a human rights group based in britain says more than 40,000 people have died. through it all, president assad and his administration have hung on to power. a spokesperson for the syrian national coalition argues getting rid of assad requires a two-track approach. walid al bunni says nations need to isolate the president and su. >> we have two ways -- putting pressure on russia, china and iran to stop supporting this regime, and then this would be useful, or supporting militarily the opposition or the interfering by the nato to make free zone and no-fly zone. >> reporter: russia and china have repeatedly vetoed u.n. security council resolutions on imposing sanctions against syria. without their support, the international efforts can only put limited pressure on president assad. diplomats here are still hoping their efforts will help in some part to end the conflict in syria. however, after 20 months of violence, they've learned getting peace will take
are profound for expanding civil society, for human rights, for addressing the needs of ordinary citizens, for building a greater economic certainty. rule of law is an essential pillar of our democracy. for china, rule of law is the best way of regulating and settling disputes in society. serving as a check against the abuse of power. the real question for china over the next few years will be, what reigns supreme for the world's second largest economy -- the party or the law? despite setbacks in recent years, wen jiabao said, rule of law will be one of three components of any future democracy along with dignity, justice, and independence as guarantees in any reform efforts. number 2, we have gone from the dais where jerry cohen was the only lawyer -- the days where jerry cohen was the only lawyer in china to 17,000 law firms. as away from -- as he weifang, there used to be only certain judges that held a bachelor's degree. too often china's justice system falls short of the laws on the books, both in practice and spirit. corruption is widespread. collusion among police and prosecutors an
from demanding respect for civil and political rights." end quote. the cuban government should release all political prisoners. the cuban government should also release allen gross, the american who has been jailed for more than three years now for distributing telephones in cuba. as i understand it, he is in poor health and a humanitarian parole is more than justified. when we hear about the cuban government's policies toward its people, the repression of their basic freedoms, the persecution of political dissidents, it's understandable to want to punish the government and to weaken it so that it collapses. we have to ask ourselves if our goal is to punish the cuban government or instead to help the cuban people. our goal should be to help the cuban people. further, we have to ask ourselves whether continuing the embargo will accomplish that goal. in my view, the answer is clearly no. it defies belief and 50 years of historical evidence to think that continuing the embargo will result in the toppling of the castro regime. that regime has survived 50 years of sanctions. fidel castro is
attacks on former high-ranking officials. >>> right now, a developing story from the civil war in syria. senior u.s. officials tell abc news, president bashar assad's forces have loaded nerve gas components into bombs at or near syrian airfields. it is assumed, the intent was to move the bombs onto aircraft. but there's no way to know if that happened for certain. the issue, of course, has the full attention of the obama administration. >> our concerns are that an increasingly desperate assad regime might turn to chemical weapons or might lose control of them to one of the many groups that are now operating within syria. >> syrian ground forces and rebels have been battling in and around syrian capital of damascus. it is now estimated that more than 40,000 people have been killed in violence in march 2011. >> just an atrocity there. >>> now to the pink slips at citigroup. the company is slashing 11,000 jobs worldwide. about 4% of its work force. more than half of those cuts will come from consumer banking. and they are aimed at saving $900 billion next year alone. investors were apparen
region on the brink of war? >> it is boiling. what we're witnessing right now is a series of civil wars. one is completely open in syria. as you mentioned there is the issue of chemical weapons. we could talk about that quickly. in libya the militia attacked us in benghazi. you have the unsettled situation in yemen. iran which is building its own weapons system and missile and penetrating iraq. in syria i may say the issue of chemical weapons is the most serious. yes, the regime is moving weapons away from the forces of the rebels but you don't know at what time the regime may use them. you don't know when al qaeda penetrating the rebels may seize some of these rebels. it is a very tense situation in syria. melissa: just so frightening. walid phares. thanks so much for joining us. >> thank you for having me. lori: rising tensions in the middle east, oil under pressure today. fox business contributor phil flynn of price futures group following all the action from the pits of the cme. why is not oil reacting more to the news out of egypt and for that matter syria, too? >> because the mark
's liberal constitutionalism. it's these documents. it's civil society. egypt seems to be going in the direction of not liberal democracy but illiberal democracy. >> right. you're absolutely right that people who are worried about egypt right now absolutely see it going in this illiberal direction. the constitution guarantees some individual rights, has great language about individual rights, but it makes it all subject to the sharia or principles of the sharia. >> the state is given charge of public morality. a loose open ended term. >> absolutely. women's rights, for example which there's been a constitutional article that said the state will work to achieve equality between men and women. as long as it doesn't violate principles of the sharia. that was in the constitution. now it's gone. now there's a nondiscrimination clause, but it doesn't mention women as a protected class. it is a step backwards in terms of liberties. if you believe what we care about when we look at democracy, we don't just care about the voting, it is important, we care about freedom and liberty for peo
coverage. i don't think you can have a civilized country without affording that to your citizens so right away i am supportive of that the industry we are supportive of that and on the other hand there are aspects that are disturbing. there's a provision that many people don't know about called the independent payment advisory board which is going to be an unelected group of people charged with cutting costs but without necessarily having a strategy. tracy: all these unintended consequences of obamacare and we wish we had more time to talk about them. thanks for being here. i hope they are listening to you. ashley: we talked for weeks and weeks about all the issues. tracy: coming and coming. ashley: liz claman will take us through the last hour of trading and has the chairman of tv ameritrade. not only a leader in the boardroom but also a college football coach running the division 1 aa program. find out what he is saying about the retail investor and if he will never come back. count down to the closing bell is next. bore copd... i took my son fishing every year. we had a great spot, not
worried about president morici sweeping it. that is more what the protests are about right now. ashley: what is the biggest danger, that this just dissolves into full-blown civil unrest? >> well, i think, even a bigger danger is the creeping of egyptian society. people are quite worried about it at this moment. it will actually prevent voters being informed on what is and isn't. ashley: expansion of powers for president morsi, kind of just voted himself into this position. is there anything that can be done about this? >> what the muslim brotherhood claims is that the last year and a half has been bad for society and bad for the economy. they need to get to this transition phase. get the constitution approved and get the country back to business. there are a lot of egyptian, so little social trust there right now. people are really fearful right now. ashley: this puts the u.s. in a bit of a difficult situation. there is a lot of money that comes to the united states to help the egyptian military. here we are, again, what does the u.s. do in this situation? it has to be a concern. >> ab
. it really doesn't matter what's going on with the economy. >> all right, we're going to leave it there. i hope you find some more entrepreneurs. appreciate it. >>> now switching gears, please listen to this. civil war and chemical weapons in syria and riots in egypt. the totalitarian regimes of saudi arabia, yemen and the list goes on, as you know, but guess what, the geniuses at the world bank think is the most pressing problem in the arab world today, global warming. a report yesterday from the world bank urges arab countries to ensure their national poli policies were "climate resili t resilient." good luck with that. you don't think they have other bigger fish to fry? the whole region is blowing up. global warming. world bank. anyway, question. how is the solid black vote for democrats hurt african-americans? we have a former nfl player and super bowl winner who says the answer is it's hurt them a lot. you don't want to miss this. he's next up. you know, one job or the other. the moment i could access the retirement plan, i just became firm about it -- "i'm done. i'm out of here." yo
, that the magnitsky act remain focused scairl and exclusively on russia. that's what russian democrats and civil society groups tell me they want right now. they want congress to send their government a message on human rights and by keeping the magnitsky act focused for now on russia we can do just that. furthermore, the administration can use its own executive authority at this time to apply similar kinds of pressures contained in the magnitsky act to human rights abusers in other countries. i for one will be watching closely to see if they do. for in many other cases are crying out for greater u.s. leadership on behalf of human rights. and if the administration does not take the initiative to apply the leverage at our disposal to these other cases beyond russia, that is the surest way to ensure that the congress will act to globalize the enact next year. there are still many people who look at the magnitsky act as anti--russia. i disagree. i believe it's pro-russia. believe it's pro-russia because this legislation is about the rule of law, and human rights, and accountability which are values
of the assad regime. he thinks he can get away with it. he believes he's lost anyway because the civil war engulfed his regime and the rebels have been on the march the last several months. >> we'll be right back with red light cameras. are they legal? citracal slow release continuously releases calcium plus d with efficient absorption in one daily dose. citracal slow release. ♪ [ male announcer ] campbell's green bean casserole. it's amazing what soup can do megyn: a major class action lawsuit over red light cameras. this new lawsuit alleges cameras are actually rigged to booths payoff for the ticket collectors. trace gallagher has more on that. >> reporter: it's a cash cow for new york city. $293 million in the past five years alone. the reason new york is being sued is the drivers think the i is rigging them. federal law says the yellow lights at intersections where the speed olympic is 30-mile-an-hour has to be at least 3 seconds long. trim a seth sent out to engineers. they checked out a dozen lights and found all of the yellow lights were too short. some of them up to a half second
for 35 years. right now same-sex marriage is legal in nine states and the nation's capital while civil unions are available in five other states. >>> smoke them if you got. r recreational marijuana is now legal washington state. pot smokers lit up like it was new year's eve. the new voter approved initiative went into effect at midnight. technically this is illegal. for now the seattle police department is turning a blind eye. last night this notice was sent out to all officers. "until further notice, officers shall not take any enforcement action other than a verbal warning for violation of 1-502." what was it like? >> reporter: well, it was certainly interesting. something different -- more different than anything i've been to before. it's a first step in a long implementation process in washington state. by the end of the year there will be pot shops on the streets throughout washington state. there will be legal pot growers. there will be pot processors. they will make everything from cigarettes and cigars to cookies and brownies if they can sell them, if they want to sell them. th
to this decendant of that legendary civilization. olympia is a true leader who has always devoted her considerable intellect, energy and commitment to doing what was right for maine and for america. olympia snowe has dedicated her life to public service. 18 years in the united states senate preceded by 16 representing maine's second congressional district, plus 5 in the maine legislature add up to a remarkable record of commitment to our nation and the great state of maine. but that span of nearly four decades tells us only part of the story. for olympia has truly set the gold standard for public service. from the statehouse to the u.s. capitol, olympia has built an outstanding reputation as an informed, thoughtful and effective legislator. she can always be counted on as a leader with integrity who pursued solutions and who had no interest in just scoring partisan political points. it is olympia's character that has made all that difference. mr. president, the private acts of public figures can tell you a lot about their character, so i want to share with my colleagues this morning a story about
reid's theory. right now, if you look at the voting history of the same there is a pro-gun majority in the senate. if subject to civil majority but would have a chance of passing to another thing that is very, very important is getting rid of senate majority leader harry reid and the future majority centers. their needs new point of order to get rid of this. reid's tactic about 60 times, far more than its predecessors all combined. it is something that would allow all members of the senate to actually participate in this deliberative process, to offer amendments. and if you were to pass this, it would be something that would be great to pass with 67 votes shutting down the debate. you might not have -- old problem of the let's call serial filibusters, it might actually go away if republicans were actually allowed to producer in the process. what we are seeing now is a construction of the minority's rights, the minority party's rights and individual's rights by trying to get rid of the motions to proceed, during the bills by enforcing the so-called talking filibusters. if you can try
promote high standards of journalism and protect both the public interest and the rights and liberties of individuals. is it should set and enforce standards. hear individual complaints against its members, and provide a fair, quick, and inexpensive arbitration service to deal with civil law claims. the chair and the other members of the body must be dependent and appointed by a fair and open process. it must comprise a majority of members who are independent of the press. it should not include any serving editor or politician. that can be readily achieved by an appointments panel which could itself include a current editor, but with a substantial majority, demonstrably independent of the press, and of politicians. in the report, i explain who might be involved. although i make some recommendations in this area, it is absolutely not my role to think to establish a new press standards code or decide how an independent self-regulatory body would go about its business. as to a standards code, i recommend the development of an industry economy which could include serving editors. that comm
of the house? >> all right. >> all right. you guys are -- were you okay in the green room? nobody separated you two, did they? it was a civil? >> no, we get along. >> in the green room -- >> any bagels in there for you guys? >> no, we don't eat bagels. >> guys on monday got bagels. >> the bagels were there? >> it's all good. >> i judge what we think -- >> i'm jewish, when i walk into a room, i immediately know if there are bagels. >> did you get a tree? >> a holiday tree? >> yeah. >> you do? >> my wife says no, they're too messy. >> the christmas tree is the celebration of saturn, anybody could have a christmas tree. >> did you get a festivus pole? >> now you're talking. >> this is a family show. >> it's early. >> thank you very much, dan. we appreciate it. chris is sticking around. up next, we are half way through the holiday shopping season. we're going to look at the winners and losers after this. >>> and 7:40 eastern time, steven ross, looking to revitalize a major area of new york. we're going to talk business and football when he joins us in a few minutes. drum and flute" can look who's b
been critical to getting the word out. video like the one posted on-line. this one right here. shows peaceful demonstrations against president bashir aul awes yad that began last year and spiralled into now what is happening. >> activists regularly posting these videos and articles about the civil war that is taking place there. often these are really just only the images we are able to get from the front lines wrush see it there. she is co-founder and managing editor of syrian deeply.org. you're a former correspondent with abc and bloomberg as well. you have seen some of the -- what is taking place there. what do you make of the civil war? >> my heart breaks like the ones in arwa's piece. what we felt we had to do was to step out of the story for a moment and just look at technology, look at what's coming out from user-generated images, from voices of syrians trying to tell their stories and just collect it in one place, so we decided to build syria deeply. it's part news aggregator, part backgrounder and part original reporting. what we felt we needed do was to give people more bac
trafficing, women's rights, international terrorism, and more. no one nation can solve many of these problems alone. each one calls for a global network of partners -- government, businesses, international and regional organizations, academic institutions, civil society groups, even individuals, all working in concert. building those coalitions is one of the great task of american leadership. we rightly call america be indispensable nation because only the united states has the reach and resolve to rally disparate nations and peoples together to solve problems on a global scale. certainly in defense of our own interests, but also as a force for shared progress. our ability to connect is unparalleled. that, in the end, in the 21st century, is what leadership is about. diplomacy and development are not always glamorous. it is like what max weber said about politics -- the long, slow, drilling -- but it is the only way we'll be able to bring together the disparate and often conflicting interests to move forward in this interconnected world. here is one moment that captures this for me -- in dece
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